Photo of Chief Arvol Looking Horse

We Can Mend the Sacred Hoop Together

The Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series on the North American West
Oct 28, 5 PM
Collins Cinema
Free and open to the public

The women’s and gender studies and American studies departments are honored to welcome Chief Looking Horse back to campus as a distinguished guest who will help launch this exciting new lecture series named in his honor, the Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Class of 1956 Distinguished Speaker Series on the North American West. The newly formed Faculty Group on the North American West, sponsored by the Newhouse Center for the Humanities, is committed to reviving a longstanding interest in Native American history, culture, and social issues that was once prominent at Wellesley College.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse (Lakota Miniconjou) is the 19th generational Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf-Pipe and Bundle and the spiritual leader of the Lakota Sioux Nation—a responsibility he was given at age 12. He has been recognized internationally for his work protecting the environment and for founding World Peace and Prayer Day, and he has spoken many times on behalf of Native American people at the United Nations.

Paula Horne (Dakota Sisseton Wahpeton) has been involved in Native American rights for over 40 years. She is an activist, leader, and renowned singer who has brought her organizational skills to World Peace and Prayer Day since 1996.

For more information, please contact:

Professor Elena Creef, ecreef@wellesley.edu

Generously supported by:

the Speaker Series for the American West Program Gift

Image Credit:

Tim Yakaitis